What are the risks of living donation?

1.

For recipients, the main surgical risks are organ rejection, infection, and blood clots or thrombosis.

2.

As well as risks from the length of surgery (average 5 hours) such as blood clots (even in the lung) and immunosuppression.

3.

4.

While challenging, these risks have been minimized through strict monitoring and early intervention with anticoagulants .

by encouraging recipients to move soon after surgery. For living donors, physical risks arise from the length of surgery (6-11 hours)

5.

There are also ethical and psychological risks. These include the possibility that a potential donor may feel pressured to donate to a family member

6.

– For living donors, physical risks arise from the length of surgery (6-11 hours) and from operative and postoperative complications, the most common being urinary tract injuries and infections.

For living donors, physical risks arise from the length of surgery (6-11 hours) and from operative

7.

For living postoperative complications, the most common being urinary tract injuries and infections.

8.

These risks can be reduced with the right advice and support. But as with all altruistic organ donation

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